Thursday, July 22, 2010

Tel Aviv Beach, circa 1971

Here's a nice view of the beach in Tel Aviv, Israel, from 1971. I'm posting it in honor of our son, who just returned from there this week after volunteering in a free health clinic for 5 months (and living a 15 minute walk from the beach!).

The back of this postcard has a very interesting message written by the sender, who was apparently non-Jewish but observant about the atmosphere in the country several years after the Six Day War in 1967. She says "there is a wonderful feeling of optimism here, despite the war, for the Israeli knows where he is going -- so different from the Western world!.." Regardless of our religious or political views, this "real" artifact of social history is intriguing!

7 comments:

Bonnie said...

And that piece of history will always be and remain to be so.

Glad to see what is on the other side of world.

Irene said...

History recorded in a casual postcard, imagine that. How special.

viridian said...

If you have visited my postcard blog then you know I love history in a postcard.

Bob of Holland said...

You must have an admirable son to do such a job for five months. Did he feel a bit of the same optimism as the author of the card did in 1971? Happy PFF.

Snap said...

Beautiful card and love the sentiment ... history in the making. I bet your son had an interesting time and did wonderful work at the same time. Happy PFF!

Max said...

Bob, I think the optimism expressed in 1971 was due to newly found freedom to continue creating a county and a future, and during most of Israel's short history that has been the case. My son was primarily acting from a desire to contribute to social justice, but with such complicated relationships today between the Israeli government, the ultra-Orthodox Jews in Israel and Reform and Conservative Jews in the US (like us), it doesn't always seem like universal Zionist patriotism is like it was.

papel1 said...

Thanks for stopping by my blog.. I found your postcard interesting as I was in Tel Aviv not too long after the war. I was teaching on an air force base in Turkey. I really enjoyed my visit in Israel many years ago.
Judy